Napkin Folding Guide

napkin folding guide

Christmas morning we started the table setting (although my mother really wanted to start it about 3 days earlier, which may have been smart, but if the kitchen table was set, where was I going to make my ‘remaining’ Christmas cards?).  If you’ve been reading for a while now, you’ve seen a picture of my kitchen table before.  My kitchen table is 8′ x almost 4′ and can easily sit 10 people.  We have two different extensions that we can add on it to make it either 12′ long or 12’4″ long, and both together make it 16’4″ long.  The difference between 12′ and 12’4″ may not sound significant, but we learned that these two numbers require different size table cloths.  That was fun.

Once we finally got the table cloth situation sorted out, I looked at my mother and asked, “what did you decide to do with the napkins?”  A sly grin spread across my mother’s face as she said, “I decided I would leave that up to you.”  WITH NO WARNING!  What do I know about folding napkins?  Absolutely nothing.  So, where do you go to learn?  Google.  The answer is always Google.  Or Wiki-how.  I started with Google.  Which brought me to a wonderful site – http://www.napkinfoldingguide.com  (Clearly)

You should check it out, it’s awesome and easy and has a lot of great suggestions.

So we had five options:

  1. The Fancy Silverware Pouch
  2. Folding it in half to make a rectangle and then rolling it
  3. The Diamond Silverware Pouch
  4. The Crown Fold (this is my mother’s usual fold, I had no idea it had a name until now)
  5. Folding it in half diagonally and then rolling it

My mother decided on option 3 – the Diamond Silverware Pouch.  And from there the table was set.  Please admire the centerpieces as well.  Props to my mother.  (I feel like there’s a post about my mother coming on.)  (Also, please enjoy the Disney Christmas parade behind the table)

My sister doesn’t know that this picture of her has made it onto my blog.  Let’s see if she actually reads it to find out… 🙂

Stay tuned for Christmas Day, part four: An Italian Antipasto.

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